Upcoming
Courses

Upcoming
Courses

Image of books stacked on top of one another

2021 Spring Courses

#fiction

FICTION

Instructor: Imad Rahman
Campus: Cleveland State University
Day & Time: Wednesdays 6:00-8:50PM
Delivery Method: Online, hybrid (synchronous & asynchronous)
Course Number: ENG 610

Book 2

Designed to be taken in conjunction with Book 1 (the previous semester). In this workshop, we will continue shaping and sharpening 75 pages of your book-length manuscripts-to-be (those students who took Book 1 in Fall 2018 will effectively be turning in pgs. 76-150). These books-in-waiting will be workshopped by all. Our tour guides for this journey will be five critically-acclaimed books of recent contemporary fiction: Vanessa Veselka's The Great Offshore Grounds (novel), Megha Majumdar's A Burning (novel), Randall Kenan's If I Had Two Wings (stories), Laura Van den Berg's I Hold A Wolf By The Ears (stories) & Charles Yu's Interior Chinatown (novel). Some of our concerns this semester will be: different ways to conceptualize, inhabit, plot, develop and complicate a novel; how to organize a stand-alone short story collection (how do these stories speak to each other, what should the ordering principle be: strength of story or theme or tone, etc.); and for the especially adventurous, what exactly is a novel-in-stories: an ungainly spillover from a short story collection or the fragments of a ruined novel or a form which contains both the compression of the story and the cohesive expansive unity of a novel? And the big question: how could you, how would you, how should you, how will you---write one of these books?

Contact: M.I.Rahman@csuohio.edu

Fiction Workshop

Instructor: Christopher Barzak
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time: N/A
Delivery Method: Online, asynchronous
Course Number: ENG 6967

In this class we will discuss techniques for the writing and revision of fiction at various lengths and in various modes or genres, and will create a constructive workshop setting in which critical techniques can be employed. We will also talk about the purposes of fiction: not only its abilities to entertain and enlighten, but also its role in reflecting and shaping culture. Our prime objective, though, is to create and revise and critique stories, openings to novels, or novellas. Course delivery will be asynchronous online.

Contact: cmbarzak@ysu.edu to register

Craft & Theory: Writing the Youth Novel

Instructor: Dr. Rebecca Barnhouse
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time: Mondays, 5:10-7:50PM
Delivery Method: Online, hybrid (synchronous & asynchronous)
Course Number: ENG 6969

In this course, students will practice the craft of writing middle grade and young adult novels. They will read several recent novels to examine issues such as point of view, voice, plot, structure, and characterization, and they will plan and begin writing and workshopping a novel appropriate for teenaged readers. We will have a visit from a literary agent, and possibly an author visit.

Texts include:
Tricia Springstubb, What Happened on Fox Street
Tehlor Kay Mejia, Paola Santiago and the River of Tears
Jacqueline Woodson, If You Come Softly
Nina LaCour, We Are Okay

Contact: rbarnhouse@ysu.edu to register

#nonfiction

CREATIVE NONFICTION

Creative Nonfiction Workshop

Instructor: Eliese Goldbach
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time: Tuesday, 4:25-7:05 PM
Delivery Method: Online, synchronous
Course Number: ENG 66895

As writers, we’ve all heard the quips and clichés about revision. Kill your darlings. Fail better. All writing is rewriting. The art of revision is paramount to our texts, but it’s often pushed to the side while we generate new material. This creative writing workshop is designed to challenge that tendency by focusing our attention on the arduous—and rewarding—process of re-writing, re-developing and re-envisioning. Students will foster a nonfiction essay through a series of radically different drafts, which will involve far more effort than doctoring up a few paragraphs or adding a bit of dialogue. Essays will change in shape, structure and intention. Each rewrite of the material will create a text that is fundamentally new, teaching students the power of a single idea and the freedom of hitting Delete. All essays and revisions will be workshopped extensively in class. Outside readings will be assigned and discussed throughout the semester.

Contact: cwing1@kent.edu to register

Craft & Theory of Creative Nonfiction: Writing in the Aftermath

Instructor: David Giffels
Campus: University of Akron
Day & Time: Thursday, 5:20-7:50 PM
Delivery Method: Online, synchronous
Course Number: ENG 3300:689-(section TBD)

A year after the Covid-19 pandemic began, literature is telling its story, just as it always does in troubled times. In this course we will examine works of creative nonfiction written and published in the aftermath of crisis, including the Hiroshima bombing, Hurricane Katrina, 9/11, personal loss, and the pandemic itself. Students will write and present critical essays and produce their own works of creative nonfiction on the topic of life in the time of Covid. The class will be fully online, with synchronous delivery.

Contact: dg36@uakron.edu to register

#poetry

POETRY

Poetry Workshop: Poems and their Cousins

THIS COURSE IS FULL

Instructor: Mary Biddinger
Campus: University of Akron
Day & Time: Monday, 5:20-7:50 PM
Delivery Method: Online, synchronous
Course Number: ENG 3300: 689-(section TBD)

This poetry workshop welcomes poems, almost-poems, and maybe-poems, as well as brief lyrical works that defy or transcend genre. We will focus almost exclusively on student writing, with a significant amount of time dedicated to workshopping, but will also have regular discussions about our relationship with genre and how we might redefine it. No books are required, but craft essays and poems (and other poemish things) will be shared throughout the semester for additional reading.

Delivery method: Weekly synchronous workshop discussion via Zoom, with classmate feedback and resources provided in a forum hosted on Brightspace.

Contact: dg36@uakron.edu to register

Craft & Theory: Archive, Search Engine, Source, Map

THIS COURSE IS FULL

Instructor: Caryl Pagel
Campus: Cleveland State University
Day & Time: Tuesday, 6:00–8:50 PM
Delivery Method: Online, hybrid (synchronous & asynchronous)
Course Number: ENG (course number TBA)

In this class we’ll consider poetry that incorporates the material of the world—archives, lists, photographs, scraps, fieldwork, memes, facts, and maps, etc.—as means of record and investigation. From physical engagement like collection or collage to documentary projects, computational modes, and poems instigated by a scribble or series of photographs, we’ll ask how our writing practice might incorporate forms, methods, and phrasing from outside the self. We’ll read contemporary poetry and hybrid works by Katherine Agyemaa Agard, Caroline Bergvall, Lillian-Yvonne Bertram, Susan Briante, Lisa Fishman, Nicholas Gulig, Kirsten Ihns, M. NourbeSe Philip, Claudia Rankine, and Brandon Shimoda, as well as embark upon a series of researched experiments of our own.

Contact: C.PAGEL@csuohio.edu to register

#playwriting

PLAYWRITING

Craft & Theory: Alternative Theatre and Performance Art

Instructor: Michael Geither
Campus: Cleveland State University
Day & Time: Monday, 6:00–8:50 PM
Delivery Method: Online, hybrid (synchronous & asynchronous)
Course Number: ENG 615

We'll use this class to trace the development of performance art and experimental playwriting, looking at the ways playwrights and non-playwrights have explored the relationship of text, performance and audience. We'll consider Vaudeville, dada, fluxus, early performance art and events, devised theater, solo performance and modern forms from artists Lori Anderson, Holly Hughes, Karen Finley, David Greenspan, Nam June Paek, Mac Wellman, Elizabeth Lecompte/Wooster Group, Pina Bausch, Anne Bogart, Rude Mechanicals, Pauline Kalker, Remi Gaillard, Young Jean Lee, and Anne Washburn. The techniques and dynamics found in these works will serve as starting points for creating our own plays and experiences.

Contact: m.geither@csuohio.edu to register

#literature

LITERATURE

MFA Literature: Weird Horror

THIS COURSE IS FULL

Instructor: Imad Rahman
Campus: Cleveland State University
Day & Time:  Thursdays 6:00-8:50PM
Delivery Method: Online, hybrid (synchronous & asynchronous)
Course Number: ENG 616

This class will exist on the intersections of horror and the 'new weird' & inform and invigorate the work of the emerging writer by examining techniques deployed by writers of both overlapping forms. We'll try to turn madness and mayhem into art and meaning by pairing writers to see how they speak to each other. Silvia Morena Garcia's Mexican Gothic examines bruised fruit in a bodega aisle while Stephen Graham Jones’ The Only Good Indians purchases a pack of cigarettes at the counter. Matt Ruff's Lovecraft Country sips sour lager with Hari Kunzru's White Tears at a dimly-lit roadside dive as locals cast sinister glances their way. Helen Phillips' The Need passes a message scrawled on a sticky Post-It note to Victor LaValle's The Changeling as they brush past each other on a fog-cloaked street. Jeff Vandermeer's Annihilation  renovates a secluded country manor for Zoja Stage's Wonderland to move into. Rumaan Alam's Leave The World Behind gulps a bitter cup of coffee with Samanta Schweblin's Little Eyes in a brightly-lit cafe, surrounded by mannequins. Alma Katsu's The Deep & Mona Awad's Bunny find themselves trapped in an elevator together as the lights flicker on and off. We’ll read to see how you can continue the conversation by subverting or affirming the expectations of these form(s) to enlighten and entertain. During the last three or four weeks, students will present 20 to 25 pages of original prose influenced by any tradition(s) of literary horror and/or the new weird to the class for an unconventionally-interactive workshop (i.e. one where the writer is not always expected to remain silent). 

 Contact: M.I.Rahman@csuohio.edu

19th Century American Studies

Instructor: Dr. Lucas Hardy
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time:  TBA
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 6917

Examines 19th-century American literature and culture through particular themes, genres, styles, periods, and/or figures.

Comics Studies/Queer Theory

Instructor: Dr. Christopher Michael Roman
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Tuesday, 4:25-7:00 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: ENG 66401

In the past several years, there’s been a explosion of queer comics—that is, “comic books, strips, graphic novels, and webcomics that deal with LGBTQ themes,” as professor and cartoonist Justin Hall writes. These contemporary works are part of a queer genealogy that stretches over four decades. This seminar will introduce students to this rich history of queer comics in America from the 1960s through the present. We will consider how these works represented various identities and current events over time and how and where these comics were published and circulated. While this course will focus on understanding comics through queer, trans, feminist, gender, and sexuality studies approaches, students will also be introduced to the field of comics studies. This course will also be useful for students with an interest in contemporary North American literature, cultural studies, marginalized histories and creators, book history, grassroots publishing, memoir studies, visual and popular cultures. Professionalization activities, thinking about comics as queer archives, as well as, digital approaches to comics and queer scholarship will accompany the completion of a final project. Guest Speakers include Justin Hall, editor of No Straight Lines, Valentino Luca Zullo (graduate of our PhD program, and 2020-2021 Ohio Center for the Book Scholar-in-Residence), and Whitney Porter (PhD, Kent 2021)

(TW: some of the texts we read in this course contain nudity and depictions of sex).

Psyche and Literature

Instructor: Vera Camden
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  TBA
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 66895

This course works at the intersection of psyche and society, reviving and re- viewing a saying from the 1970s—that “all politics is personal”--to show how the uses of literature and psychoanalysis of culture can help with “working through” pressing political and personal questions of our moment, including gender, race, freedom of expression, environmental destruction and the search for meaning. The goal of the course is to bring psychoanalysis into dialogue with literature in its myriad cultural forms to address such questions. Selec- tions from theoretical/historical works by Freud, Winnicott, Christopher Bol-las, Adam Phillips, Mari Ruti, Josie Billington will be positioned in dialogue with select canonical writers such as Milton, Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, as well contemporary writers such as Marilyn Robinson, Richard Powers, and graphic narrativists Yeon-sik Hong, Nick Drnaso.

African American Literature

Instructor:  Babacar M’Baye
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Wednesday, 5:30-8:15 PM
Delivery Method: Online
Course Number: ENG 76104/ ENG 66104

This graduate course explores the development of African American literature from its inceptions in African oral traditions to its manifestations in African American folktales, poetry, slave narratives, and other forms of writings and cultural expressions. We will examine a variety of genres of African American protest writings such as slave narratives, novels, autobiographies, memoirs, drama, poems, essays, short stories, and other works of black American authors of different generations. The contexts will include the colonial era, the Antebellum, the Postbellum, the Jim Crow era, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and later periods that witnessed crucial developments of radical, nationalist, feminist, modernist, postmodernist, and cosmopolitan African American writings and aesthetics. We will analyze the social, political, economic, and cultural concerns in these texts to understand the multiple roles that literature and tradition have played in African American struggles for freedom, equality, and justice. We will also study African American literature’s function as a tool against slavery, racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, and xenophobia in America, as an evidence of hybridity and authenticity in African American culture, and as a testimony of the deprivations, alienations, violence, disenfranchisement, betrayal, dilemma, and hopelessness that failed and broken promises of equality, justice, full integration, modernization, and multiculturalism have created in the lives of African Americans. 

This course is preparatory for teaching or studying African American literature, ethnic studies, cultural studies, multiculturalism, American studies, history, folklore, sociology, law, political science, journalism, and other fields. 

Graduate Seminar

Instructor:  Adam Sonstegard
Campus: Cleveland State University
Day & Time:  Tuesday, 6:00 PM-8:50 PM
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 695

Topic: Hawthorne, James, Wharton

#electives

ELECTIVES

Professional and Technical Editing

Instructor: Dr. Russell Brickey
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time:  TBA
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 6949

A study of the skills needed to make appropriate changes in the content, grammar, mechanics, style, format, and organization of manuscripts for scholarly, trade, journalistic, and other professional publications. The course deals with stages in the publishing process, hard-copy versus online editing, mechanical and substantive editing, and the use of house and press styles.

Sociolinguistics

Instructor: Cynthia Vigliotti
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time:  TBA
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 6950

An investigation of the relationship between language and society. Includes discussion of dialects and standard languages, language planning, linguistic identity, multi- and bilingualism, class, gender, ethnicity, and social interaction.

Publication Issues and Management

Instructor: Dr. Phil Brady
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time:  TBA
Delivery Method:  TBA
Course Number: ENG 6953

Exploration of the issues involved in managing and producing professional publications, including publications in students' own fields. Focus on organizational, editorial, and authorial voice; editorial policies; audience analysis; and the processes by which publications are conceived, designed, and produced.

Documents & Texts

Instructor: Wesley Raabe
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Monday, 6:35–9:20 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: ENG 66895

Have you ever wondered which edition you should adopt to teach a course? Whether you can cite an electronic text in a scholarly article? Our task in this course will be to gain a fairly thorough familiarity with the history and practice of editorial work by drawing on several related disciplines in Anglo-American and European scholarship: bibliography, textual criticism, and the emerging practices of digital humanities. Bibliography has traditionally been the study of books as material objects, but the discipline has expanded to encompass many forms of print and now digital textuality. Textual criticism is the study of how texts are altered and transformed during processes of transmission. And digital humanities will be invoked in this course as a critical practice by which we look again at paper media like books and magazines as a means to transmit literary works—and as a lens with which to view critically and engage interactively with the proliferation of digital textual resources for undergraduate courses. 

At a theory and topic level, our course has two concerns: 1) We will investigate the study of formal description and transcription of printed documents and manuscripts, from Early Modern to contemporary. 2) We will study the means that scholars use to identify textual variants and both the theoretical groundings and formal practices that describe those variants in editions. At a practical level, we will engage with three formal practices, 1) struggling with and against the tools (physical devices and software applications) that allow such practices to be performed, 2) employing the research tools that allow for annotation, to elucidate explanatory contexts that may or should clarify reading practices, and 3) considering methods to teach literature-related topics using digital humanities tools. 

Second Language Listening and Speaking

Instructor: Sarah Rilling
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Thursdays, 4:25-7:05 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: TBA

This course will examine the teaching of listening and speaking (integrated and as separate skills) to second language learners. Both traditional and modern approaches to teaching listening and speaking will be surveyed, and computer support for independent language learning will be explored. A world englishes view of intelligibility will challenge more traditional notions of teaching a specific variety of pronunciation, and intelligibility across proficiency levels will be considered. IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) will be reviewed and applied. Integration of listening and speaking with other language skills will be included. The applied nature of the course means that you will have opportunities to develop curriculum, lessons, and assessments for students at different levels of language proficiency.

Literate Practices and Sociolinguistics

Instructor: Sarah Rilling
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Monday, 4:25-7:05 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: ENG 63034

In this course you will read, write, and discuss current topics in sociolinguistics to include dialect, multilingualism, and world englishes. We explore urban sociolinguistics together and individual projects focus on research in a chosen context. Linguistic tools and research methods will be reviewed, and you will integrate these into research proposals for sociolinguistic study. Some course readings will be assigned while others will be negotiated depending on individual student goals for language study.

Theories in Second Language Acquisition

Instructor: Ryan Miller
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Monday, 4:25-7:05 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: ENG 63033

This course provides a general introduction to key theories, topics, research findings, and debates in the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA). The aim is to introduce you to a range of contemporary and historical issues and approaches to SLA. Over the course of the semester—through reading and discussing seminal and state-of-the-art papers—you will gain an understanding of basic findings from theoretical and empirical research in SLA. The course will give an introduction to the three major approaches to SLA research—cognitive, linguistic, and sociolinguistic—as well as pedagogical applications and instructed SLA research.

Descriptive Grammar of English

Instructor: Sarah Rilling 
Campus: Kent State University
Day & Time:  Tuesday, 4:25-7:05 PM
Delivery Method:  Online
Course Number: ENG 63041

In this applied grammar course, we will study word classes, phrases, clauses, sentences, and discourse to see grammar at work and to provide you with the linguistic terminology needed to analyze and present grammar to language learners. We will consider common error patterns of second language learners of English, and we will study ESL grammar and teacher training textbooks in developing lessons and curriculum for grammar in language teaching. In addition to writing and presenting on grammar and pedagogical grammar topics, you will gain experience in preparing lessons and assessments for learners at varied levels of proficiency. Modern computerized tools of corpus linguistics will also be studied, and you will present research findings based on active use of electronic corpora.

#internship

INTERNSHIP

NEOMFA Internship

Instructor: Christopher Barzak
Campus: Youngstown State University
Day & Time:  N/A
Delivery Method: Online, asynchronous
Course Number: ENG 6997

The internship course centers on student's completing a work-related experience in some area of interest related to creative writing, with additional professionalization activities designed by the instructor to help students prepare for positions in their chosen field after graduation. Professionalization themes: Teaching Creative Writing in the University, Building Literary Community, and The Business of Writing. Course delivery will be asynchronous online. Students should speak with their advisors about potential internships available to them in their communities, if they do not have one already pre-arranged. When you have an internship arranged for, or plan to arrange for one and have any questions, please email the instructor with the details of the internship in advance of the semester start.

Contact: cmbarzak@ysu.edu to register 

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© 2019 NEOMFA
English Department
Kent State University
P.O. Box 5190
Kent, Ohio 44242

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